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Mistik kurgusal karakterler hakkında göz önüne alındığında bu hikayeden ne beklediğimi bilmiyordum, ama çok duygusal bir roller coaster yolculuğu olduğu ortaya çıktı! Kesinlikle bu dünyanın neresinde olduğunuzu ve gerçekten kim olduğunuzu anlamak hakkında bir şey okumayı seven herkese tavsiye ederim.

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Field Gray is about the experiences of a Berlin police detective, Bernie Gunther, who becomes entangled in a web of espionage and deceit after being captured by the Red Army in 1945, serving hard time in a Russian POW camp, deflecting back to Germany, escaping to Cuba, being captured by the CIA, and finally being forced to serve for French Intelligence, which ultimately lands him back to his original starting point in Berlin in 1954. Sound interesting? Absolutely! And I felt this novel had such tremendous potential at the start, with Gunther hiding out in an exotic location (Havana) and being blackmailed into taking a mysterious woman (an undercover assassin!) on a boat to Haiti. But quite literally, the action ends there. And that is page 19. The next 300+ pages has Gunther in the hands of one set of interrogators or another, as he is captured before reaching Haiti. So the reader learns his backstory from 1931 through to the present (which is 1954) as he answers questions from whichever holding cell he happens to be in at the time. Therefore, most of the novel is a frame story in that sense. But the problem is, Gunther is just a leaf blowing in the wind. He makes no decisions regarding his own fate, and relates to his past experiences in such a way that there is very little room for the reader to feel emotionally connected to the character or his experiences. At one point, I just stopped caring what happens to him anymore. The last 50 pages finally becomes interesting again as Gunther gets himself involved in a plot to help the French capture a wanted traitor while simultaneously tricking them into helping the Americans capture their wanted criminal—a ruthless Stasi communist who regularly appears throughout Gunther’s backstory (and actually existed in real life). For the first time in the novel, Gunther finally does something. But to get there, you have to suffer through the rest, and that includes the introduction of countless names (I counted over 60 names in the first 100 pages), ninety percent of which have absolutely nothing to do with the course of the novel’s events. It just makes one feel disconnected to Gunther and his plight. The good thing about this novel is that the author is actually an excellent writer. Lots of sharp humor, lots of wit. Gunther is a wise-cracking gem, and his retorts often evoke an internal giggle. It is also an historical novel in the sense that Gunther’s story takes place amidst events which seem to be depicted pretty accurately, from the rise of Hitler and the Nazi Party through to the end of the War and the Nuremberg Trials. That is definitely interesting. But I think this is also supposed to be a spy thriller. Only, where is the thrill?