agnev

Agne Petrauskaite Petrauskaite itibaren Texas itibaren Texas

Okuyucu Agne Petrauskaite Petrauskaite itibaren Texas

Agne Petrauskaite Petrauskaite itibaren Texas

agnev

This book was sent to me by the author and it was an advance reader copy, some of the information included in the book may be changed before it is printed for full distribution. I think this book would speak to women who are Mom's. I don't have any children, and this author is writing about the changes that happened in her life once she married and eventually had 3 boys. She had to down size their living arranagements to avoid foreclosure. Each chapter speaks of a different area or time in her life. I'm sure anyone who has raised children would enjoy the book more than I did. I liked it, but it took me a while longer to finish the book than some that I read. Here is the excerpt from the back of the book: Introducing a writer with a keen eye, a wicked tongue, and an appealing take on family. In the family of Jen Lancaster and Elizabeth Gilbert, Kyran Pittman is the laid-back middle sister: warm and witty and confiding, with an addictively smart and genuine voice-but married with three kids and living in the heartland. Relatable and real, she writes about family in a way that highlights all its humor, while at the same time honoring its depth. A regular contributor to Good Housekeeping, Pittman is well loved because she is funny and honest and self-deprecating, because her own household is in chaos ("semi-domesticated"), and because she inspires readers in their own domestic lives. In these eighteen linked, chronological essays, Pittman covers the first twelve years of becoming a family, writing candidly and hilariously about things like learning to maintain a marriage over time; dealing with the challenges of sex after childbirth; saying good-bye to her younger self and embracing the still attractive, forty-year-old version; and trying to "recession- proof" her family (i.e., downsize to avoid foreclosure). From a fresh new talent, celebrating the joys and trials of a new generation of parents, Planting Dandelions is an entertaining tribute to choosing the white-picket fence over the other options available, even if you don't manage to live up to its ideals every day.

agnev

Wow. I have always wanted to reat this book --but I don't remember when or where I heard of it or why. I am just as fascinated by Sylvia Plath's poetry and her life as I am by this book. Such a tragedy that her life ended as it did, by suicide, with small children--what could have made her do that with them in mind? What drives the creative spirit, what tortures does it take to make a human soul bear its all, to share with the world a private hell? Yet so eloquently, so easily, so familiarly, as if hearing a story from a friend, and understanding, in the moments spent with her, agreeing that it all seems so reasonable, so "rational", almost, to be going through it . . . and rooting for her that she overcomes, and re-enters the "real world", whatever that is.