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Enrico Turinetto Turinetto itibaren Pury End, Towcester, Northamptonshire NN12 7NS, İngiltere itibaren Pury End, Towcester, Northamptonshire NN12 7NS, İngiltere

Okuyucu Enrico Turinetto Turinetto itibaren Pury End, Towcester, Northamptonshire NN12 7NS, İngiltere

Enrico Turinetto Turinetto itibaren Pury End, Towcester, Northamptonshire NN12 7NS, İngiltere

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If Goodreads allowed half-stars, 4 and a half is what I'd rate it. It was good enough that I finished it in 24 hours. I read Sarah at Smart Bitches review, and I'd agree that there's not a lot of angst and conflict in the book, just a very sweet friends to lovers story. Friends to lovers is a trope I enjoy very much, but it may not be for everyone. Not a lot of meat to it, but a satisfying diversion, and Oh. My. God. when Marcus finally blows, he goes up like an inferno! Very hot consummation scene. Always love Julia Quinn's books and her characters! Are the Smythe-Smith clan going to make a series? She left quite a few possible sequels, like the brother and also the mysterious governess.

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i'm not going to lie...this story disturbed me...it's much more preverse than the movie, but it is fantastically written.

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Emi and Polly Leto are identical twins, yet as they grow up they have great differences in character. When I began reading the book I kept being reminded of Her fearful symmetry by Audrey Niffenegger, which I read a couple of years ago. It was also a kind of Bildungsroman about identical twins, and was also set in London, at least in part. For the first few chapters I kept thinking that I could always give up and abandon the book if it got too boring, but somehow it never did, and the story got more interesting as it progressed, and I think it is considerably better than Her fearful symmetry. Emi, who was always closer to her mother when they were growing up, decides, as her mother did at one point, to drop out of her life, and disappears completely in order to reinvent herself. But she fails to tell Polly or any of her friends where she has gone, leaving them wondering what has happened to her. I suppose that is one of the things I find interesting and appealing about the story. We are interested in family history, and one comes across a surprising number of people who seem to disappear without a trace, without telling members of their family where they are going. Nowadays electronic social networks make it relatively easy to find old friends that you haven't seen for years, but only if they want to be found. It is difficult to find someone who really wants to hide, though in the end they often do surface somewhere. I last saw my own father when I was 12 years old, and only found out that he had died 14 years after his death. As the book points out, thousands of people go missing every year, and while some turn up within a week or two, many are never found by their friends and families, and the police aren't very interested unless there is good reason to suspect foul play.