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Sergio itibaren Whitland, Whitland, Pembrokeshire SA34 0RB, İngiltere itibaren Whitland, Whitland, Pembrokeshire SA34 0RB, İngiltere

Okuyucu Sergio itibaren Whitland, Whitland, Pembrokeshire SA34 0RB, İngiltere

Sergio itibaren Whitland, Whitland, Pembrokeshire SA34 0RB, İngiltere

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one of the best things about it is the listings of other books to read!!

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I came to Schaffert via "The Mermaid in the Tree," a wonderful short story in the My Mother She Killed Me anthology that stars Miranda and Desiree, the child protagonists at the heart of a series of books in The Coffins of Little Hope. "The Mermaid in the Tree" is a very fantastical tale with sprinkles of the grotesque; I was hoping for the same sort of world in The Coffins of Little Hope. But Coffins is a much different kind of story. Though the glorious weirdness of "The Mermaid" flitters at the edges of Coffins, ultimately it's a much tamer story, set in a quaint, realist rural community. That's not to say I didn't enjoy it. In fact, I really savored the entire first half of it. Schaffert achieves a sort of indirect omniscience with his first person narrator, Essie, who communicates with the other characters enough to be able to report their thoughts and feelings secondhand. It's a sort of a reportorial omniscience, a very interesting approach. As captivating and endearing as Essie is, though, I felt like Schaffert was more excited about the untold Miranda and Desiree stories. He's even created a website, rothgutts.com, where he has fleshed out the Miranda/Desiree world. Ultimately, I, too, was more excited about the fantastical tinges in Coffins of Little Hope, but the novel was still a worthwhile read.