stefania_tedeschi

Stefania Tedeschi Tedeschi itibaren Thirukkottaram, Tamil Nadu, Hindistan itibaren Thirukkottaram, Tamil Nadu, Hindistan

Okuyucu Stefania Tedeschi Tedeschi itibaren Thirukkottaram, Tamil Nadu, Hindistan

Stefania Tedeschi Tedeschi itibaren Thirukkottaram, Tamil Nadu, Hindistan

stefania_tedeschi

Parlak parçalar, diğer parçalarda kayda değer.

stefania_tedeschi

ilk kitaptan çok daha iyi sevdim, bağladım çok daha hızlı tempolu ve daha ilgi çekici. # 3 üzerinde ...

stefania_tedeschi

I was underwhelmed by the previous novel, Dictator but delighted to see a return to form here. Carver felt like a slight change in style, a Bond villain style bad guy, closer ties to the British Intelligence services and a story that does not just focus on Carver himself. Introduced in the excellent “The Accident Man”, Carver is a skilled assassin, ex-special forces type. He’s a ‘good’ assassin (?) who only goes after guys who deserve it but he keeps trying to retire but being dragged back into the game. Here the markets are being manipulated by our bad guy and Carver is blackmailed into an assassination plot, meanwhile MI6 boss Jack Grantham is also taking an interest in the same guy. Carver ends up working with Grantham ( a great character by the way) to try to understand the end game. Cue eco-terrorists, Russian bad girls, the Chinese intelligence services and even Carver’s old chums from the SBS. It has pace and short, sharp, chapters. Action is blended well with a structured story and a variety of interesting characters and plot twists. Minor downsides were the original set up for the blackmail (too daft a premise) and a terrible scene where the bad guys explain the plot to each-other (in case we readers had missed it) but these do not overly detract from an easy to read and enjoyable thriller.

stefania_tedeschi

** spoiler alert ** ****spoiler alert*** I only so-so liked it for different reasons than most other reviewers. I am not shocked by Ethan's death, but I did feel that it was too simple. Celina and Ethan's deaths as vampires should have been "more" in some way, not just a one page event. Which leads me to believe this is not the true end of Ethan. I do not fault Neill for killing off a beloved main character, sometimes it is needed for the growth of the series. After all immortality can be boring without some kind of change. The middle of this book dragged for me, the "hunt" was not as exciting as previous installments. And overall I feel like this was just a bridge to a better, more exciting book to come (at least I hope so). Jonah looks like a promising character to watch, and now that Merit is embracing her anger and getting out of bed, I'm sure more exciting things are to come. Not my favorite of the series, but it will not leave me dropping the series. Can't wait for the next one......

stefania_tedeschi

obviously, by FAR the best book in the series. i mean, i loved them all, but i had to give the others 3 and 4 stars just so that there was a reference point

stefania_tedeschi

I read this book in small chunks and considered giving up several times. Tibor Fischer sets his novel in Soviet era Hungary, the story culminating with the Hungarian Revolution of 1956. The protagonist, Gyuri Fischer (ahem, cough cough, did Jonathan Safran Foer read this book? The character-named-for-the-author is only one reason I pose the question . . . more on that later if I feel up to it), is stumbling through life, his biggest goal avoiding more compulsory army service. He's on a basketball team representing the locomotive workers, and his teammates are the other principal characters. They travel around Hungary raising hell and participating in standard jocky crudity. If you find jocky crudity funny, maybe you'll find the book funny. The crude jokes (a bet that ends in someone trying to defecate in somebody else's hands, etc., etc.) are probably meant to be rendered touching by the more depressing details of the boys' unhappiness and entrapment in the bloc -- and the fact that somebody on the team is leaking info to the AVO (I won't spoil it). The last part of the book is all about the Revolution, with a remarkably flat love interest thrown in for good measure. Fischer's writing is overwrought and his word choice, while driving you to the dictionary (and that's never bad), frequently feels excessively clever-clever. I was shocked this book's humor did so little for me -- I'd found his short story collection riotous. The book is billed as black humor, but didn't quite hit me that way. Fischer's heart is in the right place trying to pull off war with humor, but he overdoes it.