mishaeljn-baptiste

Mishael Jn Jn itibaren Montricher, İsviçre itibaren Montricher, İsviçre

Okuyucu Mishael Jn Jn itibaren Montricher, İsviçre

Mishael Jn Jn itibaren Montricher, İsviçre

mishaeljn-baptiste

Oh, boy. I almost didn't finish this book because it is very intense. The saving grace to this book is one of the main characters, Alice Piper. American literature is full of books of small towns filled with small minds. And there are few shining lights in Haeden, NY. What was really nasty about this town was the blindness of most to the disappearance of a young woman. Obviously, a "drifter" or some other outsider must have taken, abused and killed Wendy White. She was a "townie" and townie's don't hurt their own. But the underlining theme is that big town or small, there are people who do evil, if they aren't just evil themselves. And these people can wear a white bread, church going, good boy mask and fool people just too set or scared to see that actions do speak louder than words. The victimizers were obvious to the outsiders such as the Cleveland born journalist Flynn and of course, Alice Piper. This novel is a first by the author, and she takes on the cause of railing against a culture that promotes violence against women. But I found another noteworthy theme in the book. Alice's parents moved up from NYC to provide a back to the earth kind of upbringing of their daughter. They too have a type of blindness in not realizing that their attempt to live a "true" life was really false because it was supported by a friend's money. They are idealistic to a fault, and their child rearing methods of exposing Alice to concepts that needed much more maturity to process helped cause a secondary tragedy in this story. I still wonder why the New York State Police were never called in to investigae the Wendy White story more fully. I think the journalist got too complacent as well. I would suggest this book, but be in the right frame of mind when you pick it up.