andriansyah-mk

Andriansyah MK MK itibaren Poliantho 692 00, Yunanistan itibaren Poliantho 692 00, Yunanistan

Okuyucu Andriansyah MK MK itibaren Poliantho 692 00, Yunanistan

Andriansyah MK MK itibaren Poliantho 692 00, Yunanistan

andriansyah-mk

Hard to believe this precious coming-of-age novel came from the author of Cloud Atlas, but the man is clearly a style chameleon, and in this novel, he chooses to re-inhabit his / our tortured adolescence and channel the frustrations and incomprehensible worldview of a too-smart-for-his-classmates 13 year old boy. Certainly I could identify with precocious Jason Taylor: I'm pretty sure I was once chased around by bullies, could count my pubic hairs on two hands, and was utterly clueless around the girls. But for some reason, I couldn't love this novel. Something about writing from the perspective of a 13 year old came across as false and grating, even though, in many ways, the circumstances and events rang true. It was also structurally uninteresting -- also a surprise turn after the brilliant architecture of Cloud Atlas. It reminded me of Tobias Wolff's memoir. It's like a false memoir, but written at the time of events rather than reflecting back through time. Each chapter is like its own short story from a boy's life. Plot-wise, it feels lacking, or maybe just a little too predictable. Boy overcoming awkward adolescence. Boy dealing with parents fighting and ultimately splitting up. The book didn't offer me anything new. Of course, Mitchell can write: it's a snappy read and can veer downright poetic at times. I'll probably go back to the Mitchell well, eventually. A fine palette cleanser after 2666. Now I could use something with a little more meat on its bones, thanks.