ugomatix

Ugo Martinez Martinez itibaren San Cristóbal Texcalucan, Méx., Meksika itibaren San Cristóbal Texcalucan, Méx., Meksika

Okuyucu Ugo Martinez Martinez itibaren San Cristóbal Texcalucan, Méx., Meksika

Ugo Martinez Martinez itibaren San Cristóbal Texcalucan, Méx., Meksika

ugomatix

This is my favorite in the series so far. The second book did not seem quite as imaginative as the first as it seemed to carry over much of the imagination, but this one works afresh while staying within the realm of the developed imaginary world. Fforde manages to have a lot of fun with metafiction in a much less academic way than I am used to seeing. Really a fun book to read.

ugomatix

I had some trouble with several things. The timeline doesn't make sense. I can't see the domes being built and functioning the way they do in a single generation. How could that sort of mindset be achieved in such a short time? Plus, I can't understand why the only adults in the book are his parents, one uncle and grandfather. Why is it only teens doing everything? What do all the grown ups do? The "suspense" was more annoying to me than intriguing. Lots of questions, but nothing going on for a while. The ending is set up for a sequel that I won't find the energy to read. On the plus side, there was nothing I wouldn't let my 10 year old read. It wasn't a bad read, and once I was halfway through it, I was interested in knowing what was going to happen next.

ugomatix

This was rather delightful - Raab and Dunn play some exquisite corpse and other games, and while some of the opening poems feel a little too playful and not quite finished, the last five poems here especially hit the bullseye. Not too Dunn, not too Raab, these poems find a wonderful 'tween world of personality.