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Joye Li Li itibaren Texas itibaren Texas

Okuyucu Joye Li Li itibaren Texas

Joye Li Li itibaren Texas

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At this time in our history the subject of "illegal immigration" comes up on an almost daily basis. "The Snakehead" is the story of illegal immigration that was occurring in the 1980's. There was an almost unbelievable influx of Chinese into this country and the bulk of them coming from the Fujian Province. In New York's Chinatown, a middle aged woman by the name of Sister Ping ran a $40 million dollar smuggling business from a tiny noddle store. Sister Ping came from the Fujian Province and smuggled so many people into the United States that by the 1990's the Province contained only the very young or the very old. These immigrants came to the United States with a high work ethic and the promise of a good life. The majority of those smuggled came with only the clothes on their backs. They had little money and no documentation. The were easily absorbed into the mainstream of America by working in low paying jobs and keeping a very low profile. Sister Ping's system, and others, started to fall apart when the ship "Golden Venture" was run aground in Queens, New York. There were 300 illegal's aboard, and those that made it ashore were apprehended by the authorities. It is estimated that 30,000 to 40,000 Chinese are still smuggled out of China every year. It still remains a very lucrative business amounting to a $20 billion dollar criminal industry. This is second only to the drug trade. The smuggling of humans into countries has grown over the years and people are being smuggled from almost all countries that are economically depressed or war torn. Although the largest numbers of illegal immigrants come to the United States, estimated to be 12 million, these people are now being spread to any country where they feel they can improve their status in life and meld into society. "The Snakehead" combines both history and true crime, and studies the question of illegal immigration from both standpoints. This is a very good read and will probably appeal more to the historian than those who read true crime.